buju
01 Jan 1970 |

domestic

shop

 

 

 

DOMESTIC VIOLENCE

By   Sista   IVY

In 2010/2011, an average of 2 women a week were killed by a male and/or former partner: this constituted around one-third of all female homicide victims.
In 2010/2011, domestic violence accounted for 18% of all violent incidents reported in England and Wales.
dom2

What is domestic violence ?

Domestic violence is any incident or pattern of incidents of controlling, or threatening behaviour, violence or abuse between those aged 16 or over who are or have been in most cases intimate partners or family members regardless of gender or sexuality.

dom6
Controlling behaviour is: a range of acts designed to make a person subordinate by isolating them from sources of support, Ie friends and family exploiting their resources and capacities for personal gain, depriving them of the means needed for independence, resistance and escape and regulating their everyday BEHAVIOUR.. >

How common is domestic violence ?

Though only a minority of incidents of domestic violence are reported to the police, the police still receive one call about domestic violence for every minute in the UK, an estimated 1,300 calls each day or over 570,000 each year. However, according to the British Crime Survey, less than 40% of domestic violence crime is reported to the police.

Who are the victims ?

The vast majority of the victims of domestic violence are women and children, and women are also considerably more likely to experience repeated and severe forms of violence, and sexual abuse. Women may experience domestic violence regardless of ethnicity, religion, class, age, sexuality, disability or lifestyle. Domestic violence can also occur in a range of relationships including heterosexual, gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender relationships, and also within extended families.

Who are the abusers ?

The majority of abusers are men, but in other respects, they vary: abusers come from all walks of life, from any ethnic group, religion, class or neighbourhood, and of any age.
The abuser is responsible, and there is no excuse for domestic violence.

dom1

The abuser has a choice to use violence, or instead they can choose to behave non violently, fostering a relationship built on trust, honesty, fairness and respect. The victim is never responsible for the abuser’s behaviour.
‘Blaming the victim’ is something that abusers often do to make excuses for their behaviour. This is part of the pattern and is in itself abusive. Sometimes abusers convince their victims that they are to blame for the abuser’s behaviour. Blaming his behaviour on someone or something else – the relationship, his childhood, ill health, alcohol or drug addiction is an abuser’s way of avoiding responsibility for his behaviour. Abusers choose to behave violently to get what they want and gain control. Their behaviour may originate from a sense of entitlement which is often supported by sexist, racist, homophobic and other discriminatory attitudes.

Why doesn’t she leave  ?

Whilst the risk of staying may be very high, simply leaving the relationship doesn’t guarantee that the violence will stop. In fact, the period when a woman is planning or making her exit, is often the most dangerous time for her and her children.

dom4Women and children need to know that they will be taken seriously and that their rights will be enforced. They need to have accessible options and be supported to make safe changes for themselves and their children. Resources and support they will need to leave safely include: money, housing, help with moving, transport, on going protection from the police, legal support to protect her and the children, a guaranteed income and emotional support. If a woman is not sure if these are available to her, this may also prevent her from leaving.

What are the effects of domestic violence on children ?

When there are children in the household, the majority witness the violence that is occurring, and in 80% of cases, they are in the same of the next room. In about half of all domestic violence situations, the children are also being directly abused themselves.
dom3

Who is responsible for the violence ?

The abuser is responsible. They do not have to use violence. They can choose, instead, to behave non-violently and foster a relationship built on trust, honesty, and respect.
BUN DEM OUT
I was raised in a family were my father beat my mother ” your child needs a pair of shoes ” BUDOP BYE. ” CAN YOU NOT SEE ME HAVE NO MONEY” .BUDOP BYE.
For years the nigger mentality exsit many beatings, many cry eye water, family uprising.
My sister pick up another nigger unable to express them self, BUT SHE KEPT GOING BACK “HIM LOVE ME” what an expression of love. When I was at school I gave a few beatings to some guys, it must have been love.

.
AND NOW THE JUDGEMENT MY SISTER,S CHILD (FIRST LOVE) PICK UP ANOTHER NIGGER SAME OLD STORY BUT THIS TIME I THINK NO ONE KNEW IT WAS HAPPENING. WHY MY NIECE PROBABLY BELIVED THIS IS NORMAL BEHAVIOUR FOR RELATIONSHIPS HER DAD DID IT BEATINGS KICKINGS ETC. NOW SHE’S DEAD AGE 23.
BUN the nigga them !

.

RAW ROO TS.